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Professor Omari Simmons addresses Carolina College Advising Corps on social capital and higher educational access

Professor Omari Simmons

Omari Simmons’ research interests include corporate governance and education policy. Prior to joining the Wake Forest Law School faculty in 2006, Professor Simmons worked as corporate counsel for two multinational corporations and as an associate at the law firm of Wilmer Hale in Washington, D.C.

Wake Forest University School of Law Professor Omari Simmons gave a lecture on July 18 to the Carolina College Advising Corps at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill concerning his research on social capital and higher education access.

The Carolina College Advising Corps helps low-income, first-generation college, and underrepresented students find their way to college. By placing recent UNC-Chapel Hill graduates as advisers in high schools across North Carolina, the Corps helps students plan their college searches, complete admissions and financial-aid applications, and enroll at schools that will serve them well.

Launched in 2007 and funded by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Annie Penn Community Trust and the Golden LEAF Foundation, the Carolina Corps is one of 13 constituent programs in the National College Advising Corps which is headquartered at UNC-Chapel Hill. According to the College Board, high-achieving students from low-income families have about the same chance of enrolling in college as low-achieving students from high-income families.

For the 2010-2011 academic year, 21 advisors will serve 55 high schools in 22 counties across the state of North Carolina and advise more than 8,000 graduating seniors.

Now entering its fourth year, advisers work closely with guidance counselors and other school personnel to create programs that meet the needs of the students in North Carolina high schools. Typically, an adviser works in two high schools, helping students research and apply to a broad range of two- and four-year schools, with the goal of finding the one that fits each individual best.