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Brad and Carole Wilson give $1 million to fund scholarships, Career and Professional Development Center

Carole and Brad Wilson ('78)

Carole and Brad Wilson ('78)

Brad and Carole Wilson have given $1 million to the Wake Forest School of Law. The Wilsons’ generosity will address two priorities for the law school: transforming The Worrell Professional Center to meet the changing needs of law students, and providing endowed scholarships.

Brad Wilson (’78) is a graduate of the Wake Forest University School of Law. He has served on the Law Board of Visitors and will return as a member of that board in July, as well as chair the law school’s capital campaign committee. The Wilsons’ son, Alex, received his undergraduate degree from Wake Forest in 2008.

“We support Wake Forest University and the School of Law because of our strong belief in their approach to educating the whole person and preparing students to give back to the world,” said Brad Wilson. “We are grateful for what Wake Forest has meant to our family.”

Specifically, the Wilsons’ gift will establish the Brad and Carole Wilson Career and Professional Development Center, a key enhancement within The Worrell Professional Center, the home of the law school. The Career and Professional Development Center will dedicate space for mentoring and employer recruitment visits, and also serve as a focal point for law students to develop professional and leadership skills.

Dean Blake D. Morant said, “The provision of the most effective resources and opportunities for career and professional growth ensures that our students will have a positive impact on their clients and communities.”

The Brad and Carole Wilson Law Scholarship will also help Wake Forest address the burden of student loan debt through an endowed scholarship.

“Wake Forest competes with the nation’s top law schools for the brightest students,” Morant said. “The Wilsons’ generosity will allow us to attract top applicants and help extraordinary students who otherwise could not afford to attend law school.”