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Allison Levene ('14)

Graduate Profile: Meet Allison Levene (’14)

Degree:  J.D.

Hometown: Stamford, Conn.

The Sunday after graduation, Allison Levene (’14) will be getting married and then it’s time to start studying for the bar exam.

Q: What inspired you to pursue law school?

A: As cliché as it sounds, I came to law school so that I could help people. For many people, the law is difficult to understand and they often see the law as something that works against them rather than for them. I want to be able to use my law degree to help these kinds of people. I want to be able to use my knowledge of the law to explain to them their situations and their rights in ways that are easy to comprehend. I want to make the law less scary and actually show people that it is on their side and can be used to their advantage. Continue reading »

Hooding 2014

Law school confers hoods on largest class of international graduates in 120-year history

The Wake Forest University School of Law conferred hoods on 228 graduates, including 30 international Master of Laws in American Law degree (LLM) candidates, Juris Doctor (JD) candidates, and Master of Studies in Law (MSL) candidates. That is compared to 24 international graduates in 2013, which included the law school’s first Scientiae Juridicae Doctors (S.J.D.). It is the largest class of international graduates in the law school’s 120-year history. Continue reading »

Gregory Parks

Professor Gregory S. Parks is co-author of “Fox News’ divisive race strategy” article in Salon.com

Excerpted from “The Wrongs of the Right: Race and the Republican Party in the Age of Obama”

Right-wing political figures have often defended the content of Fox News and other right-leaning media. A common ploy is the insinuation that the “mainstream” news establishment is in fact biased in favor of liberal ideological framings of issues or that it is actually antiwhite. For example, Sarah Palin famously blamed the “leftist lamestream media” for allegedly pressuring Newt Gingrich to soften his critique of Republican congressman Paul Ryan (while in fact the disapproval came from Fox News), and Palin again insinuated charges of political targeting when she decried the media as attacking right-wing figures with their brand of unfair “gotcha journalism.” Rush Limbaugh also compared the mainstream press to a “drive by shooter except the microphones are guns.” Limbaugh further asserted that the anti-right, mainstream media attempts to “destroy people’s careers. Then they get in the convertible, head on down the road and do it all over again, while people like you and me are left to clean up the mess with the truth. So I call them the drive-by media.” Continue reading »

Professor John Knox

Professor John Knox, U.N. Independent Expert on Human Rights and the Environment, quoted in Living Green Magazine article

The article, “Sharp Rise in Environmental and Land Killings as Pressure on Planet’s Resources Increases,” is published here as an excerpt from Living Green Magazine.

Urgent action is required to challenge impunity of perpetrators,protect citizens,and address root causes of environmental crisis.
Killings of people protecting the environment and rights to land increased sharply between 2002 and 2013 as competition for natural resources intensifies, a new report from Global Witness reveals. Continue reading »

Senator Phil Berger (’82) is called ‘likely the most powerful politician in N.C.’ in News & Record article

Last summer Ellie Kinnaird, an Orange County Democrat, resigned after 17 years in the state Senate to organize a grass-roots counterattack on the new voter ID law. Her chamber’s version of the bill had been shepherded into law by the staunchly conservative Senate leader, Phil Berger (’82), a Republican whose views on major political subjects such as taxes and education could not be more different from those of Kinnaird. Continue reading »

Richard Dietz ('02)

Richard Dietz (’02) receives Outstanding Young Alumnus Award from Shippensburg University

SHIPPENSBURG — Five Shippensburg University graduates received the Outstanding Young Alumnus Award during the spring undergraduate commencement ceremony May 10.

Recipients are William Craig, Class of 2000; Richard Dietz, 1999; Katherine Heatley, 2007; Coast Guard Lt. Sean Palmer Jehu, 1996; and Marie R. McDonald, 1997. Continue reading »

Hooding Ceremony

Wake Forest University School of Law to confer hoods on the largest class of international graduates on May 18-19

The Wake Forest University School of Law will confer hoods on its largest class of international graduates on May 18-19, 2014.

The Hooding Program is scheduled to begin at 1:45 p.m. on Sunday, May 18, in Wait Chapel. Thirty international Master of Laws in American Law degree (LLM) candidates, Juris Doctor (JD) candidates, and Master of Studies in Law (MSL) candidates will receive hoods. That is compared to 24 international graduates in 2013, which included the law school’s first Scientiae Juridicae Doctors (S.J.D.).

In another first for the law school in 120 years, the Hooding Program will be webcast live via the Internet so that family and friends of the graduates who are unable to attend in person can view the ceremony. The Livestream link is http://new.livestream.com/wfu/2014law . The law school is the first WFU graduate school to offer a live webcast of its Hooding Ceremony in the history of the university. Viewers of the Livestream may refer to the Hooding program in PDF on the Wake Forest University website here. Continue reading »

Justin Jenkins (’14) and Zachary Dunn (’15)

Appellate Advocacy Clinic students Zachary Dunn (’15) and Justin Jenkins (’14) attend oral argument of definition of marriage case in Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals

Zachary Dunn (’15) and Justin Jenkins (’14) attended oral argument in the case of Bostic v. Schaefer at the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Continue reading »

Professor John Korzen (’81 BA, ’91 JD) talks to reporters after today's oral arguments in front of SCOTUS in CTS Corp. v. Waldburger.

Professor John Korzen’s U.S. Supreme Court argument featured in Kernersville News

Kernersville resident and Wake Forest University School of Law professor John Korzen can cross off arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court from his bucket list of things to do during his lifetime, following his appearance before the court’s nine justices on April 23 as legal counsel for a group of Asheville property owners.

John Korzen is the Director of the Appellate Advocacy Clinic and an Associate Professor of Legal Writing.  John is certified by the North Carolina State Bar Board of Legal Specialization as a specialist in Appellate Practice Law.  He is admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of the United States; federal courts of appeal for the Fourth Circuit, Seventh  Circuit, and Eleventh Circuit; the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina; and all North Carolina state courts.  Before joining the faculty in 2003, John practiced law with Anderson, Korzen & Associates, in Kernersville, NC, and with Smith Helms Mulliss & Moore (now Smith Moore) in Greensboro, NC, for a total of eleven years.

View the article on Kernersville News.

Professor Mark Hall

Professor Mark Hall cited in The Seattle Times regarding the U.S. insurance industry and the Affordable Care Act MLR provision

SEATTLE — U.S. health insurance companies pared their expenditures and profits by $3 billion in 2011 and 2012, benefiting American consumers.

Insurers refunded $513 million to customers in 2012, down from $1 billion in 2011. The companies also shrank their profits and the amount spent on marketing, other administrative items and brokers’ fees by $1.4 billion during those years, according to an analysis released today by the Commonwealth Fund. Continue reading »