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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons writes about fatal police shooting in Ferguson in Huffington Post blog

The fatal police shooting of unarmed teenager, Michael Brown, and the subsequent events in Ferguson, Missouri, once again highlights the tensions that continue to exist between police officers and the residents of poor urban communities. Brown’s fatal shooting comes only weeks after a police officer killed another unarmed man, Eric Garner, in New York City, by allegedly subjecting him to an illegal chokehold. While it is important to wait for the results of an investigation into the Brown shooting, many Ferguson residents lack faith in the local police department to conduct an impartial investigation into the circumstances surrounding Brown’s death. Continue reading »

Journal Photo by Andrew Dye -- 10/04/12 - Mark Rabil(left), the director of the Wake Forest University Innocence and Justice Clinic and Darryl Hunt, the Director of the Darryl Hunt Project, pose for a portrait at the Wake Forest University Innocence and Justice Clinic.

Innocence & Justice Clinic’s Darryl Hunt reflects on serving 19 years in prison for crime he didn’t commit

Darryl Hunt has been a free man for a little more than 10 years now, but he remains guarded. These days, Hunt works with the Innocence and Justice Clinic at Wake Forest University School of Law. Through the clinic, he goes to Experiment for Self-Reliance to help people get their criminal records expunged, does public speaking and talks to law students about his case. Continue reading »

Speakers announced for 10th annual Converge South tech conference to be held at Wake Forest Law on Friday, Oct. 17

Want to learn more about “when social hits the fan” and “the vanity of social media”? What about what to do when your audience doesn’t want to engage or the forces of disruptive innovation? Continue reading »

Professor Eugene Mazo

Wake Forest Law faculty make a splash at SEALS

Nearly eight hundred law professors gathered at the Southeastern Association of Law Schools 2014 Annual Conference in Amelia Island, Florida, on August 1-7, 2014. They came to present their latest research, to learn from each other, and to discuss the latest developments in the legal profession. Better known as SEALS, this conference constitutes one of the largest annual gatherings of law professors in the country, and participation in its events is considered an honor for members of the legal academy. Continue reading »

Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law announces 2014-15 staff

The Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law has announced its new student members for the 2014-2015 academic school year. Continue reading »

Master of Studies in Law (MSL) program featured in PreLaw magazine

Wake Forest Law is featured in the article, “The one-year legal-education option,” in the August 2014 issue of PreLaw magazine. The article profiles the MSL (Master of Studies in Law) degree program citing its application to careers including health care administrators, librarians, educators, scientists, and engineers among others. The article points out how many professions intersect with the law, and how a one-year MSL degree gives a person a solid foundation of understanding the law to excel in various careers. Continue reading »

Read Prelaw’s article “The One-Year Legal-Education Option”

(PDF) The One-Year Legal Education Option (PreLaw 2014) (1) (1)

Gregory Parks

Professor Gregory Parks speaks at ABA panel regarding implicit bias within the judicial system

Professor Gregory Parks spoke on Saturday, August 9, 2014 at the ABA Judicial Division Annual Meeting in Boston as part of a panel of legal experts presenting   “. . . and Justice for Some: Unconscious Bias and the Law.” Parks noted that implicit bias is arguably a pervasive issue within the judicial system.

“The fundamental principle behind it is that people make automatic, subconscious associations between categories of people and positive or negative concepts,” he said. “As such, in the criminal context, blacks are likely to be surveilled, followed, searched, encouraged to plea, get prosecuted, found guilty, sentenced more harshly. The influence of implicit race bias can be seen in the decision making of police, prosecutors, defense attorneys, jurors, and even judges.” Continue reading »

Professor Mark Hall

Professor Mark Hall is quoted regarding universal insurability and Affordable Care Act in Triad Business Journal

Professor Mark Hall spoke in a panel discussion sponsored by the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, August 12 about the Affordable Care Act stating “…the main point and the key objective is universal insurability — making sure that everyone has the ability to apply for and be granted health insurance coverage. Whether they can afford it is another matter, but making sure that access was there is the seat.” Triad Business Journal reporter, Owen Covington, authored the article below regarding the discussion  Continue reading »

Newest group of international students hail from nearly a dozen countries

Wake Forest Law welcomed its newest group of international students during Orientation, which began Monday, Aug. 11.
Continue reading »