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Elder Law Clinic to co-host ‘Healthy LGBTQ Aging: Strategies for Success’ on Sept. 23

The Elder Law Clinic at Wake Forest University School will co-host, “Healthy LGBTQ Aging: Strategies for Success,” on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. (EDT) at Parkway United Church of Christ, 2151 Silas Creek Parkway in Winston-Salem, N.C. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required by Sept. 16. Continue reading »

New grant allows Child Advocacy Clinic to expand custody guardianship for domestic violence victims

A new grant will allow Wake Forest Law’s Child Advocacy Clinic and the Children’s Law Center of North Carolina to partner to hire a custody attorney guardian for families where there is both domestic violence and issues over the custody of minor children. Continue reading »

Elder Law Clinic to co-host cultural competency training for dealing with older LGBT clients on Aug. 4

The Elder Law Clinic at Wake Forest University School of Law and the Piedmont Triad Regional Council Area Agency on Aging Regional Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program will co-host, “A Caring Response for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Clients,” program at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 4, at Senior Services, 2895 Shorefair Drive. Continue reading »

Wake Forest Law Community Law and Business and Innocence and Justice clinics relocate to Worrell Professional Center

The Wake Forest School of Law Community Law & Business Clinic (CLBC) is relocating to the newly renovated Worrell Professional Center on the Reynolda Campus as of July 1. Continue reading »

Professor Tim Davis

Professor Timothy Davis named Wake Forest Law’s newest academic dean

Professor Timothy Davis will serve as Wake Forest Law’s newest Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. He is the first African American to serve in this role at the law school. Continue reading »

The National Law Journal: Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77) among female deans taking charge

As Interim Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77) makes the transition to dean in July, The National Law Journal’s Karen Sloan points out that “11 — fully 40 percent — of the 28 deans slated to take over this summer are women — a spike that has not gone unnoticed.” Read the original story here.

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Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77) named dean of Wake Forest University School of Law

Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77) will become the next Dean of the Wake Forest University School of Law, effective July 1. Continue reading »

2015 Feeding Frenzy dignitaries, front from left: Mason Freeman and Anna Short (Womble Carlyle), Ann Gibbs (Wake Forest School of Law), Tonya Mason (Mason Law Firm), Attorney General Roy Cooper, and Ashley Delamar, VP Development for Food Bank of Central and Eastern N.C. Back: Peebles Harrison (Rose, Harrison & Gilreath), Wilson Loftis (Moore & Van Allen and Feeding Frenzy chair), Lars Simonsen (Simonsen Law Firm) and Virginia Pleasants (Bell, Davis & Pitt).

Wake Forest Law is NCBA Feeding Frenzy champion repeat

The results of the 2015 North Carolina Legal Feeding Frenzy, conducted by the Young Lawyers Division of the North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) in conjunction with North Carolina Feeding America Food Banks, are in.

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Professor Kate Mewhinney

Wake Forest Elder Law Clinic to participate in free Advanced Healthcare Planning workshop on Wednesday, April 15

Wake Forest Law Professor Kate Mewhinney, director of the Elder Law Clinic, and two law students, LaRita Dingle (’15) and Crissy Dixon (’16), will participate in a free Advanced Healthcare Planning workshop from 1-4 p.m. on Wednesday, April 15, at Senior Services in Winston-Salem, N.C.  Presented by the North Carolina Bar Association, the workshop is one of 55 offered during the month of April, which has been designated National Healthcare Decisions Month, as part of the Community Partnership for Compassionate Care coalition’s  “Got Plans?” campaign. Continue reading »

Wake Forest history professor Ed Hendricks outside Tribble Hall on Tuesday, April 21, 2009.

Former Professor Ed Hendricks, author of law school’s centennial book, was part of Wake Forest history

Much of J. Edwin Hendricks’ life story can be gleaned from the last four digitals of his home telephone number: 1834.

It seems fitting that those four numbers – the year of Wake Forest’s founding – belonged to a historian who loved Wake Forest’s history and who was one of the longest serving professors in the University’s history.

Hendricks, who retired in 2009, died March 27 in Winston-Salem. He was 79.

“He was one of the most gentle, intelligent, considerate people I have ever known,” said Chris Hendricks, one of his three children. “He loved his students and Wake Forest.”

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