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Wake Forest Law School Professor Kami Simmons

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons quoted in New Jersey Star-Ledger on investigation of Newark racial-profiling cases

A three-year investigation of the Newark Police Department has unearthed numerous constitutional violations in pedestrian stops and arrests, as well as the use of excessive force that is disproportionately affecting black citizens. Wake Forest Law Professor Kami Chavis Simmons discusses the difficulty of proving intentional discrimination in court in the New Jersey Star-Ledger, saying, “Often times, in order to prove these cases, you need a smoking gun or some testimony that this is why the officer…engaged in this conduct, and that’s very difficult to find.”

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(link to PDF) Professor Joel Newman’s article “Do IRC Sections 174 and 41 Really Matter?”

Do IRC Sections 174 and 41 Really Matter

Wake Forest Law School Professor Kami Simmons

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons says chokehold is ‘indefensible’ during HuffPo Live interview

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons was interviewed on HuffPo Live on July 21, 2014 regarding the death of Eric Garner after police officers put him in a chokehold. Controversy hit the New York Police Department last week after the death of New York “gentle giant” Eric Garner, who can be seen in several videos struggling as police officers keep him in a chokehold. Continue reading »

Professor Michael D. Green

Professor Michael Green tells Winston-Salem Journal Reynolds punitive damage verdict strikes of jury overreach

A Florida state jury is trying to send a message about tobacco manufacturers’ past marketing strategies by handing R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. a $23.6 billion punitive damages award Friday.

Professor Joel Newman with the Paxton Phoenix

Professor Joel Newman visits the Paxton Phoenix, the steam-powered automobile

In the spring of 2011, I saw a piece in The New York Times about a steam-powered automobile, the Paxton Phoenix.  The car had been developed by Robert Paxton McCulloch, heir to the McCulloch chainsaw fortune.  He initiated the project in 1949, and finally abandoned it in 1954.  According to the sole, surviving member of the team—a retired foreman living in California—the project was killed by unfavorable tax laws.  Naturally, I was intrigued. Continue reading »

Wake Forest law professor Harold Lloyd poses in the Worrell Professional Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2013.

Professor Harold Lloyd writes on Huffington Post blog about controversial SCOTUS ruling in Hobby Lobby case

Professor Harold Lloyd discusses the controversial U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the recent Hobby Lobby case and its potential implications in his blog post titled “Hobby Lobby: No Veil, No Precedent, No Multiple Players?” on HuffingtonPost.com.

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Professor Mark Hall

Professor Mark Hall earns distinction of ‘Highly Cited Researchers’ by Thomson Reuters

Mark Hall, the Fred D. & Elizabeth L. Turnage Professor of Law, is among three Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center faculty members who have earned the distinction of “Highly Cited Researchers” by Thomson Reuters. Continue reading »

Professor John Knox

Professor John Knox quoted in Ensia magazine about growing violence against environmental activists

Professor John Knox is quoted in Ensia magazine article titled “Dying to Save the World,” about recent reports of growing worldwide violence against environmental activists. Ensia is an online and print magazine that showcases solutions to Earth’s biggest environmental challenges.

“Many of those murdered were ‘accidental’ human rights defenders,” says Knox, a professor of international law at Wake Forest University and independent expert on human rights and the environment of the United Nations Human Rights Council. “They got involved because it was their own land, their own forests, their own water they were defending.”

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Professor Shannon Gilreath quoted in Old Gold and Black about recent Hobby Lobby ruling by U.S. Supreme Court

Professor Shannon Gilreath is quoted in the Old Gold and Black, Wake Forest University’s student newspaper, in an article titled “Supreme Court rules in favor of Hobby Lobby.” The article outlines the controversial SCOTUS ruling that has exempted the owners of Hobby Lobby Stores from the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that employers must include contraceptive coverage for employees due to religious reasons.

Gilreath, who believes the ruling to be pro-corporation and anti-worker, is quoted saying, “Corporations are not merely the people that control them or even the people that make up their work forces. Rather, corporations are a legal fiction, with something few individuals enjoy: eternal life. The ability of individuals in a business pursuit to organize as a corporation gives them many special benefits in the business world. It seems only fair to me that if you’ve voluntarily chosen to cloak yourself in that fiction in order to receive the considerable benefits, then you should play by the rules.”

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Professor Ronald Wright

Professor Ron Wright heads to Kosovo to help form new sentencing laws

A Wake Forest Law professor is heading to Kosovo to help establish the Rule of Law in the new country. Continue reading »