Site Navigation Page Content

Research

Professor Margaret Taylor

Professor Margaret Taylor authors Iowa Law Review Online article on Board of Immigration Appeals Decisions and immigration policy

Professor Margaret Taylor was invited to respond to the Iowa Law Review article, “Advancing Executive Branch Immigration Policy Through the Attorney General’s Review Authority,” written by former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and Patrick Glen.

The original article addresses the role of the Attorney General in shaping immigration policy through the review of the Board of Immigration Appeals Decisions. Professor Taylor’s subsequent essay, “Midnight Agency Adjudication: Attorney General Review of Board of Immigration Appeals Decisions,” was published in the Iowa Law Review Online.

Professor Taylor also authored a blog entry about her essay titled, “Midnight Agency Adjudication, by Margaret H. Taylor.”  The entry, which follows, was posted on Notice & Comment, the blog for the Yale Journal on Regulation and the ABA Section of Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice, on Aug. 10, 2016.

Continue reading »

Tanya Marsh Associate Professor of Law

Professor Tanya Marsh discusses cemetery laws concerning cemetery database Findagrave in Philadelphia Inquirer

Professor Tanya Marsh was quoted in the Philadelphia Inquirer article, “Volunteers head for cemeteries to put millions of gravestones online,” published by Katie Holmes on August 8, 2016.  In the article, which follows, Professor Marsh discusses cemetery laws concerning Findagrave, a public, online database of cemetery records.

Continue reading »

Harold Lloyd

Professor Harold Lloyd publishes ‘Cognitive Emotion and the Law’ paper on SSRN, featured on Law360

Professor Harold Lloyd published his paper, “Cognitive Emotion and the Law,” on the Social Science Research Network on Aug. 1, 2016.   The paper, which discusses the integral role of cognitive emotion in law and legal analysis, was featured in the Law360 article, “Law Schools Should Be Teaching Emotional IQ, Paper Says,” published by Melissa Maleske on Aug. 3, 2016.  Maleske’s article follows.

Continue reading »

Tanya Marsh Associate Professor of Law

Professor Tanya Marsh authors article in Natural Transitions magazine regarding rights of dead, estate planning and more

Professor Tanya Marsh authored the article, “Who Controls the Dead? The Right to Make Funeral and Disposition Decisions,”  found on pages 20-22 in Issue 1, Volume 5 of Natural Transitions magazine.  In the article, Professor Marsh discusses the United States’ laws regarding human remains, the rights of the dead and the next kin, estate planning and more.  The magazine issue can be downloaded here.

Continue reading »

Harold Lloyd

Professor Harold Lloyd discusses HB2 on WUNC’s ‘The State of Things’

Professor Harold Lloyd appeared on North Carolina Public Radio (WUNC) on Aug. 2, 2016.  Professor Lloyd discussed House Bill 2, or HB2, on the program The State of Things, hosted by Frank Stasio.  The corresponding print story, “Court Challenges to NC Laws,” by Laura Lee and Adam Hochberg, follows.

To listen to the podcast, click here.

Continue reading »

Professor Michael Curtis

Professor Michael Curtis writes ‘A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting’ in The Huffington Post

Professor Michael Curtis authored the following op/ed, “A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting,” in The Huffington Post on Aug. 2, 2016.  The post discusses the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to strike down North Carolina’s voter restriction laws, which were originally passed in 2013.  A three-panel judge made the unanimous decision on July 29, 20176.  The complete article follows.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

Continue reading »

Harold Lloyd

Professor Harold Lloyd responds in Huffington Post to Fourth Circuit’s striking of discriminatory provisions in N.C. election law

Professor Harold Lloyd wrote the following on his featured Huffington Post blog here published on July 29, 2016.
Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down provisions of Gov. Pat McCrory’s “omnibus” election law requiring photo identification in form blacks are less likely to have and requiring changes to early voting, same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and preregistration all in ways carefully calculated to adversely affect black voters. The full text of the opinion merits careful reading and can be found here. Continue reading »

Formerly with Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo Productions, Professor Heather Gram brings an entertainment industry perspective to the classroom

Having worked in legal broadcasting and on productions such as “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” Professor Heather Gram hopes to help her students realize the diverse applications of a law degree. Professor Gram says she plans to use her specialized experience to encourage creativity and excitement within the classroom.

Continue reading »

Credit Alessandro Grassani for The New York Times

NYT features Associate Dean Richard Schneider, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s roles in ‘Merchant of Venice’ project

Professor Richard Schneider, Associate Dean for International Affairs, is featured in the New York Times article, “Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Presides Over Shylock’s Appeal,” for his contributions to a “Merchant of Venice” project with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg this week in Venice.  The article, which follows, was published by Rachel Donadio on July 27, 2016.

Continue reading »

Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis discusses police accountability in Christian Science Monitor article regarding developments in Freddie Gray cases

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, was quoted in the Christian Science Monitor article, “Freddie Gray cases: no convictions, but a lesson,” published by Henry Gass on July 27, 2016.  The article, which follows, was posted on Yahoo! News in the entry, “In Baltimore, a lesson for rebuilding trust in police.”

Additionally, Professor Chavis was quoted in the Christian Science Monitor article, “Texas cop says prosecutors silenced him about Sandra Bland case,” published by Max Lewontin on July 29, 2016.

Continue reading »