Ferguson

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Criminal Justice Program Director Kami Chavis Simmons writes in The Huffington Post: Police Reform One Year After Michael Brown’s Death

Wake Forest Law’s Criminal Justice Program Director and Professor Kami Chavis Simmons writes about the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri, her latest entry on her Huffington Post blog: Continue reading »

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, director of the Criminal Justice Program, quoted in EBONY Magazine about Ferguson

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, Director of the Criminal Justice Program, was quoted by EBONY in the following article, “What Side Are You On: McCulloch Defends Himself, St. Louis Police.”

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons participates in SLU’s controversial ‘The Thin Blue Line: Policing Post-Ferguson’ symposium

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, director of the Wake Forest Law Criminal Justice Program, spoke about how to police policemen during the “The Thin Blue Line: Policing Post-Ferguson” symposium at St. Louis University School of Law on Friday, Feb. 20, 2015.

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons interviewed on Sirius radio regarding police reform

Director of the Criminal Justice Program, Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, was interviewed on the “Just Love,” the Catholic Charities’ Weekly Radio Program on Sirius Satellite Radio regarding the topic of police reform on Friday, Dec. 12. Host of the show, Msgr. Sullivan also spoke with Rev. Gregory Carl Chisolm, Pastor of  St. Charles Borromeo/Resurrection Chapel on peaceful protests. Continue reading »

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Professor Gregory Parks blogs in Huffington Post: ‘African-American Fraternities and Sororities: Our Fight Has Just Begun’

Just after I graduated from law school, in 2008, my second book was published –Black Greek-letter Organizations in the Twenty-First Century: Our Fight Has Just Begun (University Press of Kentucky). In the foreword, I made two points about the choice of the title, one internal to Black Greek-Letter Organizations (BGLOs), the other external. First, there are a host of internal issues that they must address. Second, and similarly, their efforts to uplift African Americans must be robust and meaningful. Together, these two dynamics — internal and external — are fights that were not resolved in the 20th Century; they are fights that BGLOs must take-on in this day and in this age in order for to remain relevant, impactful, and even viable. Continue reading »

‘Ferguson: Discussion on Race, Justice and Hope for the Future’

Forum on Ferguson brings university community together

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. –  Wake Forest University School of Divinity hosted a forum and panel discussion on Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014, about recent events in Ferguson, Mo. The forum was inspired by a need to bring, conversation, connection, and understanding across the Wake Forest student body and wider campus community.

“Ferguson: A Discussion on Race, Justice, and Hope for the Future” included Gail R. O’Day, dean of the School of Divinity and professor of New Testament and Preaching; Derek S. Hicks, assistant professor of religion and society at the School of Divinity; Kami Chavis Simmons, professor of law and director of School of Law’s criminal justice program; and Darryl Aaron, senior pastor of First Baptist Church Highland Avenue in Winston-Salem. With standing room only, students, faculty, and staff from across the university were in attendance. Continue reading »

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons participates in panel discussion on Ferguson

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, director of the Criminal Justice Program at Wake Forest Law, participated in a panel on Wednesday, Dec. 3, about racial issues.

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‘Ferguson: Discussion on Race, Justice and Hope for the Future’

Forum on Ferguson Brings University Community Together

Wake Forest University School of Divinity hosted a forum and panel discussion on Wednesday, Dec. 3 in response to the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and the grand jury decision that the officer will not face criminal charges. The forum was inspired by a need to bring, conversation, connection, and understanding across the student body and campus community. “Ferguson: A Discussion on Race, Justice, and Hope for the Future” included Gail R. O’Day, dean of the School of Divinity and professor of New Testament and Preaching; Derek S. Hicks, assistant professor of religion and society at the School of Divinity; Kami Chavis Simmons, professor of law and director of School of Law’s criminal justice program; and Darryl Aaron, senior pastor of First Baptist Church Highland Avenue in Winston-Salem. With standing room only, students, faculty, and staff from across the college and professional schools were in attendance. Continue reading »

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons quoted in Wall Street Journal regarding police tactics

Police departments around the country are racing to develop new training rules on the use of force, a response that has gained urgency amid scrutiny from the U.S. Justice Department and an emerging consensus that law-enforcement practices need to be reviewed and revamped. Continue reading »

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons co-authors article about policy changes to hold Ferguson accountable in The Michigan Citizen

The grand jury has made its decision. Now is the time for city, county and state officials in Missouri to work to restore the legitimacy they lost through the events surrounding the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown. Racially-disproportionate stops, excessive court fines, police aggression and other factors also suggest government is not serving all citizens equally. This inequality is also reflected in Ferguson’s political representation. Continue reading »