Gregory Parks

Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Gregory Parks inside the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Gregory Parks presents keynote address at MLK Day event in East Hampton, Virginia

Professor Gregory Parks presented the keynote address at an MLK Day event and was featured in the following story, “Dr. King Honored at Calvary Baptist in East Hampton,” written by Joanne Pilgrim and published by the East Hampton Star on Jan. 18, 2017.

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Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Gregory Parks inside the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Gregory Parks co-authors Indiana Law Journal article about X-Men comic as metaphor for racial discrimination and solutions

Professor Gregory Parks co-authored the following article with University of Connecticut Sociology Professor Matthew W. Hughley, “‘A Choice of Weapons’: The X-Men and the Metaphor for Approaches to Racial Equality.”  The full article was published in the Indiana Law Journal and can be downloaded here.  A summary follows.

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Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Gregory Parks inside the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Gregory Parks named associate professor for new academic year

Professor Gregory Parks has been named Associate Professor beginning July 1, 2016.  Professor Parks’ research focuses on both race and law issues as well as social science and law issues and he teaches civil procedure among other courses.

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Professor Gregory Parks writes about ‘The Rise of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’ for Atlanta Journal Constitution

Professor Gregory Parks wrote the following article, “The Rise of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,” as part of the Atlanta Journal Constitution’s occasional Sepia series that looks at black Greek letter organizations. Read the original story here. Continue reading »

Photo of Associate Professor of Law Gregory Parks

Book co-edited by Professor Gregory Parks premieres as play on Oct. 15 in New York

A book co-edited by Professor Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey has been arranged for a theatrical production, “12 Angry Men.” The play will premiere at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15, in residence at Kumble Theater for the Performing Arts in Brooklyn, New York. The theatrical readings are part of a larger event series sponsored by Bed-Stuy’s Restoration Plaza. The play is based on “12 Angry Men: True Stories of Being a Black Man in America Today,” edited by Parks and Hughey and published by The New Press in 2011. View show details and buy tickets here.

Professor Parks’ research focuses on both race and law issues as well as social science and law issues. His scholarship also focuses on black fraternal networks and their relation to the law–e.g., biographies of prominent African-American lawyers and judges who were/are life-long members of these organizations, the role of these organizations in African-Americans’ quest for social justice and civil rights, and the legal issues around violent hazing within these organizations. Professor Parks has authored or edited nearly 10 scholarly books, including “The Obamas and a (Post) Racial America?” (Oxford University Press 2011) and “Alpha Phi Alpha: A Legacy of Greatness, the Demands of Transcendence” (University Press of Kentucky 2011). Prior to coming to Wake Forest, Professor Parks practiced in Trial Group in the D.C. office of McDermott Will & Emery LLP. He has also been a Visiting Fellow at Cornell Law School and a law clerk on both the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (Hon. Andre M. Davis) and the District of Columbia Court of Appeals (Hon. Anna Blackburne-Rigsby). Follow him on Twitter @BlackJDPhD

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Graduation Profile: Bahati Mutisya (’15)

As editor-in-chief of the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy and president of the Immigration Law Society, Bahati Mutisya (’15) has not only served as a leader during her time at Wake Forest Law, but in the university’s spirit of Pro Humanitate, she has also given back to the local community by volunteering with the Big Brothers, Big Sisters program. Continue reading »

law

Journal of Law & Policy to host ’50th Anniversary of The Civil Rights Act: Looking Back and Moving Forward’ symposium on Friday, March 20

The Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy will host a symposium, “50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act: Looking Back & Moving Forward,” beginning at 9 a.m. on Friday, March 20, in the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312. The event is free and open to the public. Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit from the North Carolina Bar Association is pending approval.

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Professor Gregory Parks featured speaker for Coastal Carolina University’s MLK Jr. Celebration on Wednesday, Jan. 14

CONWAY, S.C. — Wake Forest Law Professor Gregory Parks will be the featured speaker for the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Wednesday, Jan. 14, at 7 p.m. at Coastal Carolina University’s Wheelwright Auditorium. This event is free and open to the public with a ticket.

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Photo of Associate Professor of Law Gregory Parks

Professor Gregory Parks quoted by The Associated Press regarding black sororities, fraternities response to Garner, Brown protests

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Recent protests against the police killings of Eric Garner and Michael Brown have created a conundrum for the nation’s black fraternities and sororities: to remain relevant in the black community they need to be involved, but protect their reputations if demonstrations go awry. Continue reading »

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Professor Gregory Parks blogs in Huffington Post: ‘African-American Fraternities and Sororities: Our Fight Has Just Begun’

Just after I graduated from law school, in 2008, my second book was published –Black Greek-letter Organizations in the Twenty-First Century: Our Fight Has Just Begun (University Press of Kentucky). In the foreword, I made two points about the choice of the title, one internal to Black Greek-Letter Organizations (BGLOs), the other external. First, there are a host of internal issues that they must address. Second, and similarly, their efforts to uplift African Americans must be robust and meaningful. Together, these two dynamics — internal and external — are fights that were not resolved in the 20th Century; they are fights that BGLOs must take-on in this day and in this age in order for to remain relevant, impactful, and even viable. Continue reading »