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Harold Lloyd

Professor Harold Lloyd quoted in Charlotte Observer: ‘Courts are roadblocks to NC lawmakers’ right turn’

Professor Harold Lloyd told the Charlotte Observer in the following story, “Courts are roadblocks to NC lawmakers’ right turn,” written by Anne Blythe and published on Saturday, Aug. 20, the courts are “beginning to shine the light of day on this developing agenda where the legislators appear not to have meaningful public debate on issues.”

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Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis featured in Time magazine about why police departments don’t always release body cam footage

Associate Dean of Research and Engagement Kami Chavis, founder and director of the Criminal Justice Program, is featured in the following story by Time magazine’s  about “Why Police Departments Don’t Always Release Body Cam Footage” published on Aug. 17, 2016.

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Wake Forest University School of Law

The National Jurist names Wake Forest Law among Best Value in 2016

Wake Forest Law has once again been named among the Best Value for private law schools by The National Jurist. The original story published Aug. 15, 2016, here follows.

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Professor of Law Tanya Marsh

Professor Tanya Marsh explains the difference between savings and loans and banks

Professor Tanya Marsh explains the difference between savings and loans and banks to Claes Bell, CFA, a Bankrate.com writer in the following article, which was originally published on Aug. 15, 2016, and was also picked up by Yahoo Finance.

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Tanya Marsh Associate Professor of Law

Professor Tanya Marsh discusses legal status of biological remains in Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective

Professor Tanya Marsh was featured in Philip R. Olson’s paper, “Refining and Extending Necro-Waste,” published on Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective, the digital extension of the journal Social Espistemology, on Aug. 5, 2016.  Professor Marsh discusses the legal status of biological material in regards to Indiana’s law on aborted fetal remains.  The paper, which follows, also lists her book, “The Law of Human Remains,” as a reference.

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Professor Mark Rabil, director of the Wake Forest University Innocence and Justice Clinic

Professor Mark Rabil featured in new MTV docu-series, ‘Unlocking the Truth,’ set to premiere Wednesday, Aug. 17

Professor Mark Rabil, director of the law school’s Innocence and Justice Clinic, is featured in MTV’s new documentary series, “Unlocking the Truth,” which premieres at 11 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016.  The series, hosted by wrongful conviction exoneree Ryan Ferguson and the Exoneration Project’s Eva Nagao, examines three controversial murder or assault cases.  The trailer is available here. Professor Rabil is associated with Winston-Salem native Kalvin Michael Smith’s case, which will be introduced at the end of Episode 1 and investigated fully in Episode 2. His interview was filmed in the Innocence and Justice Clinic offices in the Worrell Professional Center on Wake Forest University’s Reynolda Campus.

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Tanya Marsh Associate Professor of Law

Professor Tanya Marsh discusses cemetery laws concerning cemetery database Findagrave in Philadelphia Inquirer

Professor Tanya Marsh was quoted in the Philadelphia Inquirer article, “Volunteers head for cemeteries to put millions of gravestones online,” published by Katie Holmes on August 8, 2016.  In the article, which follows, Professor Marsh discusses cemetery laws concerning Findagrave, a public, online database of cemetery records.

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Tanya Marsh Associate Professor of Law

Professor Tanya Marsh authors article in Natural Transitions magazine regarding rights of dead, estate planning and more

Professor Tanya Marsh authored the article, “Who Controls the Dead? The Right to Make Funeral and Disposition Decisions,”  found on pages 20-22 in Issue 1, Volume 5 of Natural Transitions magazine.  In the article, Professor Marsh discusses the United States’ laws regarding human remains, the rights of the dead and the next kin, estate planning and more.  The magazine issue can be downloaded here.

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Professor Michael Curtis

Professor Michael Curtis writes ‘A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting’ in The Huffington Post

Professor Michael Curtis authored the following op/ed, “A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting,” in The Huffington Post on Aug. 2, 2016.  The post discusses the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to strike down North Carolina’s voter restriction laws, which were originally passed in 2013.  A three-panel judge made the unanimous decision on July 29, 20176.  The complete article follows.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

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Harold Lloyd

Professor Harold Lloyd responds in Huffington Post to Fourth Circuit’s striking of discriminatory provisions in N.C. election law

Professor Harold Lloyd wrote the following on his featured Huffington Post blog here published on July 29, 2016.
Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down provisions of Gov. Pat McCrory’s “omnibus” election law requiring photo identification in form blacks are less likely to have and requiring changes to early voting, same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and preregistration all in ways carefully calculated to adversely affect black voters. The full text of the opinion merits careful reading and can be found here. Continue reading »