Site Navigation Page Content

In the Media

Professor Ron Wright is one of the nation’s best known criminal justice scholars.  He is the co-author of two casebooks in criminal procedure and sentencing; his empirical research concentrates on the work of criminal prosecutors.

Professor Ron Wright quoted in Newsday: ‘Case raises questions about how we pick district attorneys’

Professor Ron Wright is quoted in the following Newsday story:

When a Nassau County emergency management official was arrested last week on perjury and misconduct charges, local reaction broke along the usual partisan lines.

Acting District Attorney Madeline Singas, a Democrat, said Deputy Commissioner Edward Korona Jr. of Hicksville falsely answered “no” on civil-service applications when asked if he’d been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor.

Continue reading »

Professor Mark Hall

NPR: Health Law and Policy Program Director Mark Hall’s hybridized Medicaid plan for North Carolina receiving national attention

Professor Mark Hall was quoted in an article by NPR, WFAE and Kaiser Health News on the changes the state of North Carolina is striving to make to Medicaid. Continue reading »

Professor Ron Wright is one of the nation’s best known criminal justice scholars.  He is the co-author of two casebooks in criminal procedure and sentencing; his empirical research concentrates on the work of criminal prosecutors.

Professor Ron Wright joins new think tank to train, study prosecutors featured in Wall Street Journal

Professor Ron Wright has been tapped to serve on the new Institute for Innovation in Prosecution, which is featured in the following Wall Street Journal story, “New Think Tank Aims to Train, Study Prosecutors.” The institute was launched by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. A portion of the original story follows: Continue reading »

Professor Michael Curtis

Professor Michael Curtis tells New Yorker magazine nation is headed in an ‘anti-democratic’ direction

Professor Michael Curtis, a constitutional historian, told the New Yorker magazine on Sept. 22, 2015, the nation is “going in an anti-democratic direction.”

Continue reading »

Professor Tanya Marsh

Professor Tanya Marsh writes in The Huffington Post: ‘A Grave Injustice to Religious and Economic Liberty in New Jersey’

Professor Tanya Marsh published the following on Aug. 31, 2015, on her Huffington Post blog: Continue reading »

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD '77)

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77) featured as Tar Heel of the Week in Raleigh News and Observer

Raleigh News and Observer Correspondent Marti Maguire featured Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77) as the Tar Heel of the Week in the following story:

As a young law professor, Suzanne Reynolds was drawn to the field of family law because of the gender disparities she saw written into the state’s laws – antiquated notions she would work to change in a long career as a prominent expert in the field. Continue reading »

Professor Ron Wright is one of the nation’s best known criminal justice scholars.  He is the co-author of two casebooks in criminal procedure and sentencing; his empirical research concentrates on the work of criminal prosecutors.

Professor Ronald Wright’s study on scarcity of elected black prosecutors across U.S. cited by Reuters, other national media

Professor Ronald Wright’s study on elected prosecutors was recently quoted in numerous national news stories regarding the fact that 60 percent of states do not have elected black prosecutors. Continue reading »

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (’77), Professor Shannon Gilreath (’02) tell Asheville Citizen Times SCOTUS decision could become landmark case

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (’77) and Professor Shannon Gilreath (’02) are quoted in the following article originally published by the Asheville Citizen Times here.

Continue reading »

Professor Andrew Verstein and John Sanders (’16) write in The Huffington Post: ‘Legal Confusion as to Spoofing’

Wake Forest Law Professor Andrew Verstein and John Sanders (’16) co-wrote the following op/ed, which appears in The Huffington Post here.

Continue reading »

Professor of Law Tanya Marsh

Professor Tanya Marsh writes in The Huffington Post about the greening of American burials

As Jessica Mitford explained in her 1963 blockbuster, The American Way of Death, American funerary and burial practices are incredibly consumptive and expensive. Our strongly entrenched social norm is that the appropriate way to express grief and show love for the deceased is by spending money — on flowers, a viewing, a casket, a vault and a prime burial spot. Our practices are in stark contrast to those in other developed countries that seek to hasten decomposition and minimize the land dedicated for burial purposes. Continue reading »