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In the Media

Professor John Knox

Professor John Knox, U.N. Independent Expert on Human Rights and the Environment, quoted in Living Green Magazine article

The article, “Sharp Rise in Environmental and Land Killings as Pressure on Planet’s Resources Increases,” is published here as an excerpt from Living Green Magazine.

Urgent action is required to challenge impunity of perpetrators,protect citizens,and address root causes of environmental crisis.
Killings of people protecting the environment and rights to land increased sharply between 2002 and 2013 as competition for natural resources intensifies, a new report from Global Witness reveals. Continue reading »

Professor Mark Hall

Professor Mark Hall cited in The Seattle Times regarding the U.S. insurance industry and the Affordable Care Act MLR provision

SEATTLE — U.S. health insurance companies pared their expenditures and profits by $3 billion in 2011 and 2012, benefiting American consumers.

Insurers refunded $513 million to customers in 2012, down from $1 billion in 2011. The companies also shrank their profits and the amount spent on marketing, other administrative items and brokers’ fees by $1.4 billion during those years, according to an analysis released today by the Commonwealth Fund. Continue reading »

Wake Forest law professor Harold Lloyd poses in the Worrell Professional Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2013.

Professor Harold Lloyd writes about voters and healthcare in the Huffington Post blog

Professor Harold Lloyd,’s article, “Biting the Hand That Feeds: Entitlements and the Fundamental Attribution Error,” is published here in its entirety from the Huffington Post blog. Continue reading »

Professor Omari Simmons’ research interests include corporate governance and education policy.  Prior to joining the Wake Forest Law School faculty in 2006, Professor Simmons worked as corporate counsel for two multinational corporations and as an associate at the law firm of Wilmer Hale in Washington, D.C.

Professor Omari Simmons referenced in Corporate Counsel article

“So You Want to Be an In-house Lawyer?” is written by James Dinnage, Corporate Counsel, who is the co-author with Professor Omari Simmons of  a law review article on the in-house role in the modern world (Innkeepers: A Unifying Theory of the In-House Counsel Role [2011], Seton Hall Law Review Vol 41, 77) and references this in the article below. Continue reading »

Professor Wendy Parker

Professor Wendy Parker quoted in The Atlantic about school district integration

Professor Wendy Parker, former Justice Department lawyer, is quoted in the article “School Districts Still Face Fights—and Confusion—on Integration” published by ProPublica and The Atlantic on Friday, May 2, 2014. Parker speaks in regard to the topic of the article, 60 years after Brown v. Board, the federal government’s enforcement of desegregation has all but disappeared. The full text of the article is below. Continue reading »

Suzanne Reynolds ('77)

Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Suzanne Reynolds quoted in Slate article on Gay Marriage in N.C.

The article “The Gay Marriage Case That Makes No Sense,” which was published on Slate.com on May 2, 2014, refers to Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Suzanne Reynolds as “having written the book on family law” and Reynolds says, “UCC clergy would be liable for a penalty only if they purported to marry a couple for civil purposes. On the other hand, if clergy performed what was purely a religious ceremony, the law would not apply.”  The full text of the article follows from Slate. Continue reading »

SCOTUSblog analyzes Professor John Korzen’s argument in CTS Corp. v. Waldburger

Professor John Korzen argued in the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday,  April 23, 2014 in the case, CTS Corp. v. Waldburger.

Writer Robert Percival wrote in the SCOTUSblog the article appearing in full below titled, “Argument analysis: Was Congress more “legally sophisticated” than the Justices when it overrode state limitations on lawsuits for toxic exposure?” Continue reading »

Wake Forest law professor Harold Lloyd poses in the Worrell Professional Center on Wednesday, April 10, 2013.

Professor Harold Lloyd writes about the Affordable Care Act in The Huffington Post blog

A friend left me a note last night: “My life has been crazy–But with God’s help it will get better.” I’ll come back to my friend. Let me first turn to another quote that drives many Americans crazy and as a result is endangering the life of my friend:

“Every American regardless of his means must have access to reasonable health care. In the absence of a single-payer system, every American regardless of his means must purchase health insurance in the marketplace to guarantee such access.” Continue reading »

Professor Abigail Perdue

Professor Abigail Perdue writes in The Huffington Post blog about animal cruelty legislation

On March 14, 2014, South Dakota became the 50th state to enact a felony provision for animal cruelty. The law’s enactment was a victory for animal welfare advocates and comports with other measures that Congress and state legislatures have recently taken to prevent animal cruelty. For example, animal fighting took center stage when reports surfaced regarding the alleged involvement of NFL free agent, Michael Vick, in an illegal dogfighting ring. Dogfighting is a felony in every state. Some states even punish possession of a fighting dog or attending a fight. Federal law provides for felony penalties arising from the interstate commerce, import, and export relating to commerce in fighting animals and paraphernalia. Several states also prohibit encouraging, enticing, assisting, or causing another person to perform any illegal activity related to dogfighting. Continue reading »

Professor Sidney Shapiro

Professor Sidney Shapiro quoted in Bloomberg BNA on proposed silica rule hearings

University Chair in Law Professor Sidney Shapiro was quoted in an  issue of the Bloomberg BNA Occupational Safety & Health Reporter article, “Hearings on Proposed Silica Rule Start March 18; Stakeholders Can Cross-Examine,” in the issue published on March 13, 2014. Shapiro was quoted regarding cross-examination of hearing participants during the three weeks of public hearings on the recently proposed OSHA silica rule. Continue reading »