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Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis co-authors article for The Nation on five ways to make America safe

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, co-authored the article, “Want to Make America Safe? Here Are 5 Ways to Do That,” with George Washington University Law School Professor Spencer Overton, published on The Nation on July 21, 2016.

Professor Chavis and Professor Overton discuss advice and solutions gathered from traveling to cities across the country.  The original article follows.

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Tanya Marsh Associate Professor of Law

Professor Tanya Marsh featured in New Scientist regarding eBay’s policy on sale of human body parts

Professor Tanya Marsh was featured in the New Scientist article, “Hundreds of mystery human skulls sold on eBay for up to $5500,” regarding eBay’s policy on the sale of human body parts in light of the website’s recent listings of 454 skulls.  The article, published by Conor Gearin on July 12, 2016, follows.

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Professor Mark Rabil, director of the Wake Forest University School of Law Innocence and Justice Clinic

Winston-Salem Journal reports Professor Mark Rabil has filed appeal to overturn 1994 conviction of John Robert Hayes

Professor Mark Rabil, director of Wake Forest Law’s Innocence and Justice Clinic, was quoted in the Winston-Salem Journal article, “Winston-Salem man appeals conviction in ’93 fatal shootings,” published by Michael Hewlett on July 16, 2016.

The article follows recent developments in the 1994 conviction of John Robert Hayes, Professor Rabil’s client.  Last Tuesday, Professor Rabil filed a petition with the N.C. Court of Appeals to overturn Hayes’ conviction and grant Hayes a new trial.  The original article follows.

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Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis authors opinion piece in New York Times about technology use among law enforcement

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, authored the article, “Technology Doesn’t Change the Need for Legal Protection,” published on the New York Times Opinion Page on July 14, 2016.  The article, which follows, discusses the use of technology among law enforcement, in light of the recent shooting of police officers in Dallas, Texas.

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Professor of International Law John Knox

Professor John Knox discusses increased assassination rate of environmental activists

Professor John Knox, the United Nations special rapporteur on human rights and the environment, was quoted in the following original article, “Murders of Activists Defending Safe Water and Environment Rise Sharply,” originally published on Circle of Blue on July 13, 2016.

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Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis co-authors article in American Prospect regarding recent police shootings, implicit bias and potential solutions

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, co-authored the article, “How We Move Beyond Dallas,” with George Washington University Law School Professor Spencer Overton, published on The American Prospect on July 13, 2016.

Professor Chavis and Professor Overton discuss the recent shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota and Texas, as well as solutions for moving forward.  They reference a number of implicit bias-related studies and research from sources including the Obama administration’s President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the New York Times, #PopJustice’s report series and more.  The original article follows.

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Professor Tim Davis

Professor Tim Davis featured in WalletHub study about sports gambling trends

Professor Tim Davis was featured in the WalletHub article, “2016′s Most Gambling-Addicted States,” by Richie Bernardo.  The article analyzes and discusses states’ gambling trends and laws.  It also includes a study that uses data collected from the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Gaming Association, National Council on Problem Gambling and more.

In the article, the study’s main findings and methodology are outlined, and a number of graphics and tables are included.  Professor Davis was interviewed about sports gambling among nine other experts in the ”Ask the Experts” section.  His interview, as well as the body of the article, follow.

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Helen Tarokic of Helen Tarokic Law, PLLC; 
Photo by Meg Beazley

Helen Tarokic (JD ’06) and Rebekah Garcia (JD ’14) interviewed by WECT about SCOTUS immigration decision

Helen Tarokic (JD ’06), an immigration attorney at Helen Tarokic Law, PLLC , and Rebekah Garcia (JD ’14), an associate attorney at Helen Tarokic Law, PLLC, were interviewed for the WECT story Supreme Court ruling will impact thousands in New Hanover County, which aired on June 23, 2016.  The print story follows.

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Photo courtesy of Scott Tong, Marketplace.org

Judge Leo Strine’s Wake Forest Law Review essay mentioned on Marketplace.org, Business Insider

Wake Forest Law Review was mentioned in Scott Tong’s article, “How shareholders jumped to first in line for profits,” published originally on Marketplace.org on June 14, 2016.  The article discusses the responsibilities of shareholders and corporations and includes a quote from Delaware Chancery Court Judge Leo Strine’s Wake Forest Law Review essay, published originally on April 5, 2012.

This article is a part of a Marketplace.org series with Business Insider called “The Price of Profits.”

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The International Jurist, summer 2016 edition cover

Wake Forest Law’s LL.M. degree program featured in International Jurist

Wake Forest Law’s LL.M. degree program was featured in the summer issue of the International Jurist as one of the best LL.M. programs in the U.S. in terms of law school experience.

The International Jurist named Wake Forest Law’s LL.M. program, which is one of the longest running in the U.S., as one of the top 14 LL.M. programs in the category.  The programs were selected based on the ability to help students receive hands-on training, collaborate with U.S. students, participate in extracurricular activities and more.

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