In the Media

Photo of Wake Forest School of Law Professor Michael Curtis

Professor Michael Curtis writes ‘A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting’ in The Huffington Post

Professor Michael Curtis authored the following op/ed, “A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting,” in The Huffington Post on Aug. 2, 2016.  The post discusses the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to strike down North Carolina’s voter restriction laws, which were originally passed in 2013.  A three-panel judge made the unanimous decision on July 29, 20176.  The complete article follows.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

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Photo of Professor Harold Lloyd

Professor Harold Lloyd responds in Huffington Post to Fourth Circuit’s striking of discriminatory provisions in N.C. election law

Professor Harold Lloyd wrote the following on his featured Huffington Post blog here published on July 29, 2016.
Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down provisions of Gov. Pat McCrory’s “omnibus” election law requiring photo identification in form blacks are less likely to have and requiring changes to early voting, same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and preregistration all in ways carefully calculated to adversely affect black voters. The full text of the opinion merits careful reading and can be found here. Continue reading »
Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis discusses police accountability in Christian Science Monitor article regarding developments in Freddie Gray cases

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, was quoted in the Christian Science Monitor article, “Freddie Gray cases: no convictions, but a lesson,” published by Henry Gass on July 27, 2016.  The article, which follows, was posted on Yahoo! News in the entry, “In Baltimore, a lesson for rebuilding trust in police.”

Additionally, Professor Chavis was quoted in the Christian Science Monitor article, “Texas cop says prosecutors silenced him about Sandra Bland case,” published by Max Lewontin on July 29, 2016.

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Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Andrew Verstein

Professor Andrew Verstein’s paper ‘Enterprise Without Entities’ published on Social Science Research Network, Legal Theory Blog

Professor Andrew Verstein published his paper, “Enterprise Without Entities,” on Social Science Research Network on July 24, 2016.  The abstract, which follows, was also posted in the Legal Theory Blog entry, “Vertsein on Business without Organizational Law,” by Lawrence Solum on July 27, 2016.

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Professor Kami Chavis co-authors article for The Nation on five ways to make America safe

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, co-authored the article, “Want to Make America Safe? Here Are 5 Ways to Do That,” with George Washington University Law School Professor Spencer Overton, published on The Nation on July 21, 2016.

Professor Chavis and Professor Overton discuss advice and solutions gathered from traveling to cities across the country.  The original article follows.

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Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Tanya Marsh posing in the Worell Professional Center

Professor Tanya Marsh featured in New Scientist regarding eBay’s policy on sale of human body parts

Professor Tanya Marsh was featured in the New Scientist article, “Hundreds of mystery human skulls sold on eBay for up to $5500,” regarding eBay’s policy on the sale of human body parts in light of the website’s recent listings of 454 skulls.  The article, published by Conor Gearin on July 12, 2016, follows.

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Photo of Professor Mark Rabil outside the Worrell Professional Center

Winston-Salem Journal reports Professor Mark Rabil has filed appeal to overturn 1994 conviction of John Robert Hayes

Professor Mark Rabil, director of Wake Forest Law’s Innocence and Justice Clinic, was quoted in the Winston-Salem Journal article, “Winston-Salem man appeals conviction in ’93 fatal shootings,” published by Michael Hewlett on July 16, 2016.

The article follows recent developments in the 1994 conviction of John Robert Hayes, Professor Rabil’s client.  Last Tuesday, Professor Rabil filed a petition with the N.C. Court of Appeals to overturn Hayes’ conviction and grant Hayes a new trial.  The original article follows.

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Professor Kami Chavis authors opinion piece in New York Times about technology use among law enforcement

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, authored the article, “Technology Doesn’t Change the Need for Legal Protection,” published on the New York Times Opinion Page on July 14, 2016.  The article, which follows, discusses the use of technology among law enforcement, in light of the recent shooting of police officers in Dallas, Texas.

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Professor John Knox discusses increased assassination rate of environmental activists

Professor John Knox, the United Nations special rapporteur on human rights and the environment, was quoted in the following original article, “Murders of Activists Defending Safe Water and Environment Rise Sharply,” originally published on Circle of Blue on July 13, 2016.

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Photo of Professor Kami Chavis

Professor Kami Chavis co-authors article in American Prospect regarding recent police shootings, implicit bias and potential solutions

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, co-authored the article, “How We Move Beyond Dallas,” with George Washington University Law School Professor Spencer Overton, published on The American Prospect on July 13, 2016.

Professor Chavis and Professor Overton discuss the recent shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota and Texas, as well as solutions for moving forward.  They reference a number of implicit bias-related studies and research from sources including the Obama administration’s President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the New York Times, #PopJustice’s report series and more.  The original article follows.

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