Innocence and Justice Clinic

Photo of Professor Mark Rabil speaking with reporters following a hearing in Iredell County Superior Court for an Innocence and Justice Clinic client

Last-minute discovery prevents Innocence and Justice Clinic client from going free from prison

The following story, “Last minute discovery prevents Iredell man from going free from prison,” by Robert E. Lee of the Statesville Record & Landmark that ran May 20, 2016, involves a client of Wake Forest Law’s Innocence and Justice Clinic.

WGHP’s Bob Buckley and the Statesville Free News also reported this story.

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Group photo of recipients of Innocence and Justice Clinic Community Service Awards at the Winston-Salem Chronicle's 31st Annual Community Service Awards Gala

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77), Professor Omari Simmons and Innocence and Justice Clinic earn Winston-Salem Chronicle’s Community Service Awards

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77), Professor Omari Simmons and the Innocence and Justice Clinic, led by Professor Mark Rabil, were honored at the Winston-Salem Chronicle’s 31st Annual Community Service Awards Gala on April 23, 2016.

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Photo of Mark Rabin and Darryl Hunt

Celebration of Darryl Hunt’s life set for Saturday, March 19, at Emmanuel Baptist Church

A funeral for Darryl Hunt, a Winston-Salem man wrongfully convicted of murder in a highly publicized case, will be held Saturday at Emmanuel Baptist Church. Hunt, who was 51, worked closely with the Wake Forest Law Innocence and Justice Clinic. Professor Mark Rabil, director of the  clinic, was an assistant capital defender in Forsyth County whose zealous advocacy led to the release and exoneration of Hunt after 19 years of incarceration.

“Twenty years of wrongful of incarceration and 12 years of being a voice for the voiceless is what killed Darryl Hunt,” Rabil said. “He embodied all that trauma  and took it on himself.” Continue reading »

Photo of Mark Rabin and Darryl Hunt

Vigil held for Darryl Hunt on Sunday, March 13, at Emmanuel Baptist Church

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — A vigil was held for exoneree Darryl Hunt, who worked closely with the Wake Forest Law Innocence and Justice Clinic, at 8 p.m. Sunday, March 13, at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1075 Shalimar Drive, in Winston-Salem.

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Professor Mark Rabil discusses Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” documentary in Public News Service

Professor Mark Rabil discusses in Public News Service whether Steven Avery, the subject of the new documentary “Making a Murderer,” was given the presumption of innocence throughout his trial. Read the full story below.

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Photo of Mark Rabil

Professor Mark Rabil discusses the problem with mass incarceration in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Professor Mark Rabil was quoted in the following article, “Legal Experts Advocate Change in Mindset Toward Policing, Incarceration” in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education on Wednesday, Oct. 28. He discusses how the mass incarceration occurring in the U.S. today is akin to modern-day slavery. Rabil has been the director of the Innocence and Justice Clinic at Wake Forest Law since 2009. In 1984, Rabil began representing Daryl Hunt, a man who had been accused rape and murder, and spent the next 20 years proving that Hunt was innocent until he was finally released in 2003. Rabil has served Wake Forest Law in many capacities, from clinic supervising attorney to adjunct professor to full professor, since 1983. Continue reading »

Police car

‘Beyond Ferguson – Criminal Justice Reform for the 21st Century’ to feature discussion by police, prosecutors on Wednesday, Oct. 28

The Wake Forest Law Criminal Justice Program and the American Constitution Society will co-host, “Beyond Ferguson – Criminal Justice Reform for the 21st Century,” at noon on Wednesday, Oct. 28, in the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312. Scheduled speakers include Walter Holton (JD ’84), former U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of North Carolina, Winston-Salem Police Department Capt. Natoshia James and Wake Forest Law Professors Mark Rabil and Kami Chavis Simmons, who is the director of the Criminal Justice Program. Continue reading »

Photo of Mark Rabil

Professor Mark Rabil participates in WFU ‘Mass Incarceration and the Criminal Justice System’ symposium

Professor Mark Rabil, director of the Innocence and Justice Clinic, spoke at the “Mass Incarceration and the Criminal Justice System” symposium held on Thursday, March 19, 2015, at ZSR Library on the Reynolda Campus of Wake Forest University. The symposium was held by The Humanities Institute of Wake Forest University.

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WGHP FOX 8 airs special report on Innocence and Justice Clinic work

After working to free Darryl Hunt, a local attorney, Wake Forest Law Professor Mark Rabil, was inspired to create the Innocence and Justice Clinic — a passionate group of Wake Forest University law students that work to free inmates who’ve been wrongly convicted. Continue reading »

The Atlantic cites Darryl Hunt case as genesis of North Carolina’s Innocence Commission

The 2003 exoneration of Darryl Hunt in the Hunt case is cited as the genesis of the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission in the article “Guilty, Then Proven Innocent,” published by The Atlantic on Monday, Feb. 9, 2015. Hunt was represented by Wake Forest School of Law Director of Innocence and Justice Clinic Mark Rabil in the lengthy case. The North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission was founded by the North Carolina General Assembly in 2007 and was the first of its kind in the nation. Since its nascence, the Commission has reviewed hundreds of innocence claims and conducted multiple hearings.  Continue reading »