John Knox

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Professor John Knox says human rights approach needed to solve climate change issues

Professor John Knox, a U.N.-affiliated independent expert on human rights and the environment, says in the Reuters article following that climate change is already interfering “with an immense range of human rights, from housing in the Maldives, to water in Tuvalu to food in the Sahel region of Africa, and… the problems of course will only get worse.”

A human rights approach to solving these problems can ensure governments take care of the neediest people in their countries, he added. Continue reading »

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Professor John Knox optimistic social justice imperative can spur productive negotiations at U.N. climate talks

For all the flack the U.N. climate talks have taken over the past 20 years, one major achievement will be on display as the next round of negotiations open in Peru today. Continue reading »

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Professor John Knox at center of United Nations climate negotiations in Lima, Peru

Wake Forest Law Professor John Knox is quoted in the article, “Social injustice dogs two promising climate solutions” on The Daily Climate on Monday, Dec. 1, 2014.

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Human rights and the environment: Professor John Knox, a UN expert, in first fact-finding visit to France

The United Nations Independent Expert on human rights and the environment, John Knox, will undertake an official visit to France from 20 – 24 October 2014, to assess how the country is implementing human rights relating to environmental protection and to identify good practices.

“France is at the forefront at linking human rights with environmental protection,” the expert said, praising it for being the first country to devote an entire constitutional declaration to the right to the environment.

The French Environment Charter raises sustainable development to the highest level in France’s legal structure, alongside the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen and the preamble to the 1946 Constitution.

“However,” Mr. Knox stressed, “it is important to assess the lessons learned and challenges faced in the country with regard to realisation of such environmental rights, as well as how it is addressing global environmental challenges with human rights impacts, such as climate change.”

During his five-day visit, at the invitation of the Government, the UN Independent Expert will meet Government officials and experts, as well as representatives of civil society.

Mr. Knox will present his preliminary observations on the visit at a press conference on the last day of the mission, Friday 24 October at 11:00, at Salle René Cassin, Commission nationale consultative des droits de l’homme (CNCDH), 35 rue saint Dominique, 75007 Paris.

Read the story on The Asia Digest.

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Professor John Knox makes first fact-finding visit to France as U.N. Independent Expert on human rights, environment

GENEVA  – The United Nations Independent Expert on human rights and the environment, Wake Forest Law Professor John Knox, will undertake an official visit to France from Oct. 20-24, 2014, to assess how the country is implementing human rights relating to environmental protection and to identify good practices. Continue reading »

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Professor John Knox quoted in Foreign Policy article about Ebola

With the Centers for Disease Control now forecasting up to 1.4 million new infections from the current Ebola outbreak, what could “big data” do to help us identify the earliest warnings of future outbreaks and track the movements of the current outbreak in realtime? It turns out that monitoring the spread of Ebola can teach us a lot about what we missed — and how data mining, translation, and the non-Western world can help to provide better early warning tools.  Continue reading »

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Professor John Knox quoted in Foreign Policy magazine about climate change

Grand words and pledges flowed out of the United Nations climate change summit in New York this week, as they always do when the world pauses to remember the dangers of melting glaciers and rising seas. This time, businesses — including a few oil companies — joined U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders in vowing to rein in climate-warming emissions. Yet, as the Washington Post‘s Wonkblog put it, “What good is a climate summit without emissions cuts?” Continue reading »

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Professor John Knox is the keynote speaker at Yale University’s International Conference held on role of human rights in global issues

On 5 September 2014, the 3rd UNITAR-Yale Conference on Environmental Governance and Democracy was held at Yale University. The conference brought together a wide range of participants, including representatives of UN agencies, NGOs, academics, human rights defenders and others to discuss issues related to “Human Rights, Environmental Sustainability, Post 2015 Development Agenda, and the Future Climate Regime” (the conference theme). The goal of the conference was to develop actions and recommendations for policy makers involved in these issues. Natural Justice attended the conference and also submitted a case study paper on community protocols in Ghana and Kenya.

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Professor John Knox quoted in Media Matters article about climate agreement and the Constitution

Conservative media are suggesting that the Obama administration is “working with foreigners to subvert the Constitution” by seeking a climate agreement with other nations without Senate approval, but legal experts agree that because it is not expected to be legally binding, the accord does not require Senate ratification.

“It’s not unconstitutional…presidents have done it countless times in the past,” said John H. Knox, a UN independent expert on human rights and the environment and professor of international law at Wake Forest University School of Law, in an email to Media Matters. Continue reading »

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Professor John Knox quoted in Ensia magazine about growing violence against environmental activists

Professor John Knox is quoted in Ensia magazine article titled “Dying to Save the World,” about recent reports of growing worldwide violence against environmental activists. Ensia is an online and print magazine that showcases solutions to Earth’s biggest environmental challenges.

“Many of those murdered were ‘accidental’ human rights defenders,” says Knox, a professor of international law at Wake Forest University and independent expert on human rights and the environment of the United Nations Human Rights Council. “They got involved because it was their own land, their own forests, their own water they were defending.”

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