Kami Chavis Simmons

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Professor Kami Chavis tells Wall Street Journal video in police officer trial over Walter Scott’s death is ‘pretty damning’

Professor Kami Chavis, Associate Dean for Research and Public Engagement and Director of the Criminal Justice Program, is quoted in the article, “Trial Over Walter Scott’s Death Revives Police-Shootings Debate,” co-written by Cameron McWhirter and Scott Calvert of The Wall Street Journal. This article was originally published Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016.

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Professor Jonathan Cardi named Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Professor Jonathan Cardi will serve as Wake Forest Law’s newest Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, taking up the position officially on July 1, 2016. Professor Cardi will be moving into the position currently held by Professor Timothy Davis, who has served as the academic dean for the past year. Continue reading »

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons interviewed by Wisconsin Public Radio about Baltimore officer acquitted in Freddie Gray’s death

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons was interviewed by Wisconsin Public Radio host Rob Ferrett on May 23, 2016, for the original story “Baltimore Police Officer Acquitted in Freddie Gray’s Death,” which follows. You can listen to the interview here.

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Professors Kami Chavis Simmons and Mark Rabil to speak on ‘Peace Officer’ film panel on Wednesday, May 11, at Salem College

Professors Kami Chavis Simmons, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, and Mark Rabil, director of the law school’s Innocence and Justice Clinic, will speak on a panel at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 11, at Salem College’s Huber Theatre following the free screening of the film, “Peace Officer.”

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons quoted in NJ.com on how prejudicial cops can affect investigations

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons was quoted in the following article, “How will cop’s racial slurs affect ‘nanny-cam’ case? Experts weigh in,” originally published on Nj.com on May 1, 2016.

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons speaks at Mass Incarceration event at the University of North Carolina School of Law

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons spoke at the University of North Carolina School of Law’s event, “Mass Incarceration: Causes, Effects and Where Do We Go From Here?” on Friday, April 8.

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Wake Forest Law Review to host ‘Implementing De-Incarceration Strategies: Policies and Practices to Reduce Crime and Mass Incarceration’ on Friday, April 1

The Wake Forest Law Review will present “Implementing De-Incarnation Strategies: Policies and Practices to Reduce Crime and Mass Incarceration” from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, April 1, in the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312. The event is free and open to the public. The North Carolina State Bar Association has approved 5.25 hours of free Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit for this year’s symposium. The keynote speaker of event will also be live webcast from 11:35 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. at this link.

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Professor Kami Simmons quoted in Christian Science Monitor regarding Baltimore video shedding new light on police violence

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons speaks at ‘Innocent Until Proven Poor’ symposium

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, director of the Criminal Justice Program at Wake Forest Law, will speak at a symposium entitled “Innocent Until Proven Poor,” hosted by the Michigan Journal of Race and Law on Feb. 19-20.

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Professor Kami Chavis Simmons quoted in Christian Science Monitor about Chicago fatal shooting case

Professor Kami Chavis Simmons, director of Wake Forest Law’s Criminal Justice Program, was quoted in the following article, “Chicago officer files countersuit in fatal shooting: A precedent?”, published originally in the Christian Science Monitor on Feb. 11.

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