Mark Rabil

VALOR

VALOR to celebrate Veterans Awareness Week Nov. 7-9 with panel discussion, Marine Corps cake cutting ceremony

The Veterans Advocacy Legal Organization (VALOR) will sponsor a number of events at the law school to celebrate Veterans Awareness Week from Nov. 7-9, 2017. The events will include a panel discussion and a Marine Corps cake cutting ceremony.

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Visiting Professor Gordon Widenhouse (JD ’81), attorney in famed Jeffrey MacDonald case, to speak Oct. 25 in Worrell Professional Center

Visiting Professor Gordon Widenhouse (JD ’81) will speak to Wake Forest Law about the Jeffrey MacDonald case on Wednesday, Oct. 25.  In the pending 4th Circuit case, Professor Widenhouse is one of the attorneys for MacDonald, who has applied for parole as he serves three life sentences for the 1970 murders of his pregnant wife and two daughters.
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Innocence and Justice Clinic, Criminal Justice Program co-sponsor ‘Re-Thinking Drug Policy’ symposium on Monday, Oct. 2

The Innocence and Justice Clinic and the Criminal Justice Program are co-sponsoring a symposium, “Re-Thinking Drug Policy: Seeking Solutions Based on Law, Science and Public Health,” with the Rethinking Community Program, the Office of the Provost, the Wake Forest University School of Medicine’s Center for Community Engagement Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Center for Research on Substance Use and Addiction and Clinical and Translational Science Institute from 1 to 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in the Bowman Gray Center for Medical Education, 475 Vine St., 5th Floor Tiered Classroom, in downtown Winston-Salem.

The event, which is also sponsored by Conservatives for Criminal Justice Reform (CCJR), is free and open to the public. It will be held in conjunction with “International Wrongful Conviction Day.”

Three hours of Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits (one hour of substance abuse, two hours of general) have been approved by the North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) for a fee. 

 

After four decades, policy analysts across the political spectrum have come to recognize that the War on Drugs is both ineffective and counterproductive. The “tough on crime” policies have led to massive increases in incarceration and have served to nurture, rather than dismantle, drug cartels. The use of mandatory minimums aimed at targeting traffickers, has instead led to essentially criminalizing addiction, throwing low level addicts into prison and only exacerbating mental health conditions. The utter failure of the War on Drugs is showcased in the current public health epidemic presented by the opioid crisis. Across the country, opioid abuse and overdose related deaths are rapidly rising to unprecedented rates. This symposium will provide context for the history of what led to this current state, consider solutions that incorporate not only the medical and scientific concerns related to addiction and over prescription, but also the criminal justice responses that have bloated our prisons and devastated families and communities across the country.

The event will be streamed live online, as well as available in two video sessions for viewing later.  Using Google Chrome is recommended.

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Media Roundup for July 14, 2017

Environmental defenders being killed in record numbers globally, new research revealsWake Forest Law faculty, students and staff are quoted regularly in the media. Following are the media mentions for the week of July 14, 2017: Continue reading »

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Professor Steve Garland (JD ’80), Justin Reissman (JD ’17) chosen to speak at 2017 Hooding Ceremony

The Wake Forest Law Class of 2017 has chosen Professor Steve Garland (JD ’80) and Justin Reissman (JD ’17) to be the speakers for the Wake Forest University School of Law Hooding Ceremony on Sunday, May 14, 2017. Continue reading »

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Kimberly Stevens (JD ’92) uses lessons learned at Wake Forest Law to defend high-profile, federal capital cases

Kimberly Stevens (JD ’92) once worked for six months without much success to establish a rapport with a man accused of murder. One day she asked him to describe his earliest memory.

“He told me about being shut inside a garbage can with the lid on and hearing the garbage truck coming to get him,” she said. “I asked him how old he was. He said three.”

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Judge orders mental competency evaluation in Innocence and Justice Clinic capital murder case

A Forsyth County judge has rejected a guilty plea in a capital case Innocence and Justice Clinic students have been working on for the past two years due to concerns about mental competency of a man accused of stabbing his girlfriend to death in 2014.

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Graphic for the 2017 SBA Wellness Week that includes a leaf pattern logo and a Wake Forest Demon Deacon graphic in a yoga pose. The graphic says 'Wake Forest Law's Wellness Week Funded by ABA Law Student Division February 6-10, 2017 THRIVE Comprehensive Wellness at Wake Forest University'

Inaugural SBA Wellness Week kicks off Monday, Feb. 6

The Student Bar Association (SBA), the student government body of Wake Forest Law, will highlight resources for practicing self-care through its inaugural Wellness Week beginning Feb. 6-10, 2017, by addressing a different facets of mental health and well-being each day from 12 to 1 p.m. in the Law Commons and beyond.

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Professors Mark Rabil, Kimberly Stevens (JD ’92) featured in USA Today

Professor Mark Rabil, director of the Innocence and Justice Program, is featured in the following story, “For Asheville attorney, a life’s work fighting the death penalty,” about Adjunct Professor Kimberly C. Stevens (JD ’92), written by Tonya Maxwell of the Asheville Citizen-Times, which was also published in USA Today on Jan. 2, 2017. An excerpt of the original story follows:

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Professor Mark Rabil tells Winston-Salem Journal his client is innocent, date petition filed is irrelevant

Professor Mark Rabil, director of the Innocence and Justice Clinic, was featured in the Winston-Salem Journal article, “Winston-Salem man claiming wrongful conviction in murders is too late in filing federal appeal, Attorney General’s Office says,” published by Michael Hewlett on  Nov. 15, 2016.  The article discusses the latest in the case of Professor Rabil’s client, John Robert Hayes.  A portion of the article follows.

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