Mark Rabil

Photo of Professor Mark Rabil speaking with reporters following a hearing in Iredell County Superior Court for an Innocence and Justice Clinic client

Last-minute discovery prevents Innocence and Justice Clinic client from going free from prison

The following story, “Last minute discovery prevents Iredell man from going free from prison,” by Robert E. Lee of the Statesville Record & Landmark that ran May 20, 2016, involves a client of Wake Forest Law’s Innocence and Justice Clinic.

WGHP’s Bob Buckley and the Statesville Free News also reported this story.

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Professors Kami Chavis Simmons and Mark Rabil to speak on ‘Peace Officer’ film panel on Wednesday, May 11, at Salem College

Professors Kami Chavis Simmons, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program, and Mark Rabil, director of the law school’s Innocence and Justice Clinic, will speak on a panel at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 11, at Salem College’s Huber Theatre following the free screening of the film, “Peace Officer.”

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Group photo of recipients of Innocence and Justice Clinic Community Service Awards at the Winston-Salem Chronicle's 31st Annual Community Service Awards Gala

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77), Professor Omari Simmons and Innocence and Justice Clinic earn Winston-Salem Chronicle’s Community Service Awards

Dean Suzanne Reynolds (JD ’77), Professor Omari Simmons and the Innocence and Justice Clinic, led by Professor Mark Rabil, were honored at the Winston-Salem Chronicle’s 31st Annual Community Service Awards Gala on April 23, 2016.

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Professor Mark Rabil speaks about his work and friendship with Darryl Hunt

Professor Mark Rabil was quoted in the following article, “Darryl Hunt’s Righteous Friends,” originally published in the Raleigh News & Observer on March 24, 2016. He was also quoted in the Black Christian News Network about his relationship with Hunt and his work to exonerate him.

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Photo of Mark Rabin and Darryl Hunt

A Remembrance of Darryl Hunt to be held on March 28

Darryl Hunt, Innocence and Justice Clinic advisor and longtime friend of Wake Forest Law, passed away on March 13. A gathering to remember Hunt will be held on Monday, March 28 at 12 p.m. in Worrell 1312. A reception will follow in the Law Commons.

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Photo of Mark Rabin and Darryl Hunt

Professor Mark Rabil tells Winston-Salem Journal Darryl Hunt inspired him, many others

Professor Mark Rabil was quoted in the following article, “Hunt vigil displays his role in community unity,” published originally in the Winston-Salem Journal on March 14, 2016.

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Photo of Mark Rabin and Darryl Hunt

Celebration of Darryl Hunt’s life set for Saturday, March 19, at Emmanuel Baptist Church

A funeral for Darryl Hunt, a Winston-Salem man wrongfully convicted of murder in a highly publicized case, will be held Saturday at Emmanuel Baptist Church. Hunt, who was 51, worked closely with the Wake Forest Law Innocence and Justice Clinic. Professor Mark Rabil, director of the  clinic, was an assistant capital defender in Forsyth County whose zealous advocacy led to the release and exoneration of Hunt after 19 years of incarceration.

“Twenty years of wrongful of incarceration and 12 years of being a voice for the voiceless is what killed Darryl Hunt,” Rabil said. “He embodied all that trauma  and took it on himself.” Continue reading »

Photo of Mark Rabin and Darryl Hunt

Vigil held for Darryl Hunt on Sunday, March 13, at Emmanuel Baptist Church

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — A vigil was held for exoneree Darryl Hunt, who worked closely with the Wake Forest Law Innocence and Justice Clinic, at 8 p.m. Sunday, March 13, at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1075 Shalimar Drive, in Winston-Salem.

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Professor Mark Rabil discusses Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” documentary in Public News Service

Professor Mark Rabil discusses in Public News Service whether Steven Avery, the subject of the new documentary “Making a Murderer,” was given the presumption of innocence throughout his trial. Read the full story below.

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Pro Bono Project efforts featured in Winston-Salem Journal for helping get certain criminal records cleared

The following story originally ran in the Winston-Salem Journal on Sunday, Jan. 31, here.

One evening last fall, a woman walked into Samaritan Ministries with baggage she hoped to unload. That baggage was a criminal charge from her youth that was preventing her from getting gainful employment.

The woman knew that help might be available from an expungement clinic being offered at the ministry on Northwest Boulevard. Students from Wake Forest University’s School of Law, working with Judge Denise Hartsfield of Forsyth District Court and supporting attorneys from the Forsyth County Bar Association, hold clinics monthly to help people determine if they qualify to have certain crimes removed from their records.

Last week, the woman was back at the clinic, expecting to face more paperwork. Instead, she found out that her petition to have her charge cleared — and the petitions of 24 others — had already been sent to Raleigh for approval.

“She was thrilled,” said Emily Morris, a third-year law student who coordinates the expungement clinics. The next expungement clinic is scheduled for 5 p.m. Feb. 23 at Samaritan Ministries.

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