police accountability

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Professor Kami Chavis discusses police accountability in Walter Scott shooting mistrial with Christian Science Monitor

Professor Kami Chavis, Associate Dean for Research and Public Engagement and Director of the Criminal Justice Program, was quoted in the Christian Science Monitor story, “Mistrial in Walter Scott police shooting sends strong message,” published by Henry Gass on Dec. 6, 2016.  In the excerpt that follows, Chavis discusses police accountability.

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Professor Kami Chavis joins national panel discussion on the future of law and order

Professor Kami Chavis participated in the panel discussion, “Law and Order Circa 2050: Will Technology Make Crime Obsolete?,” regarding the future of police crime-fighting technologies at an event on Nov. 30, 2016, in Washington, D.C., sponsored by Future Tense, a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University.

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Professor Kami Chavis quoted in American Prospect magazine article: ‘Race and the Tragedy of Quota-Based Policing’

Professor Kami Chavis, Associate Dean for Research and Public Engagement and Director of the Criminal Justice Program, is quoted in Fall 2016 issue of The American Prospect magazine article,  “Race and the Tragedy of Quota-Based Policing,” written by Shaun Ossei-Owusu.

Following is an excerpt of the original article published online on Nov. 3, 2016.

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Professor Kami Chavis interview by 88.5 WFDD about N.C.’s new police body camera law

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program and associate dean for research and public engagement, discussed North Carolina’s new police body camera law, which went into effect on Oct. 1, 2016, with Keri Brown on 88.5 WFDD’s Politics and Government segment.  The print story, “North Carolina Body Camera Law Goes Into Effect,” follows.

Professor Chavis also gave her “expert” opinion on the topic in the WalletHub article, “Should Police Wear Body Cameras? Experts Pick Sides.”

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Wake Forest Law panelist from Winston-Salem police explains efforts to curb social unrest in the Winston-Salem Journal

Assistant police chief, Catrina Thompson, emphasizes community relationships as the cornerstone to preventing social unrest in the Winston-Salem Journal’s coverage of Wake Forest Law’s “Close to Home: Comprehending Community/Police Tensions in Charlotte.” The original story, “Winston-Salem Police official: Measures in place to help curb social unrest” was written by John Hinton and was published on Wednesday, Sept. 28.

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‘Close to Home: Comprehending Community/Police Tension in Charlotte’ panel discussion set for Wednesday, Sept. 28

A campus-wide discussion, “Close to Home: Comprehending Community/Police Tension in Charlotte,” is set for 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, in the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required for anyone outside the Wake Forest University community here. It will also be live webcast here. The panel discussion will be from 5 to 6:30 p.m. followed by a student leadership roundtable and small group discussions. The event is co-sponsored by the Criminal Justice Program, Black Law Students Association (BLSA), the American Ethnic Studies Program and the Wake Forest Sociology Department.

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Professor Kami Chavis discusses legal standard for excessive force in New York Times

Professor Kami Chavis, director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Program and associate dean for research and public engagement, is quoted in the following original story, “What We Know About the Details of the Police Shooting in Charlottte,” written by Richard Fausset and Alan Blinder and published in The New York Times on Sept. 25, 2016. Continue reading the main story

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott here on Tuesday afternoon has sparked outrage and concern, and set off, once again, a national conversation about the treatment of minorities by the police. The details of the case have also been a source of intense debate. Here are some questions that readers have asked reporters at The New York Times since Mr. Scott’s death.

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Professor Kami Chavis calls for calm as well as change in police culture in light of Charlotte protests over police shooting

Kami Chavis, a Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Justice Program at Wake Forest Law, is speaking out about the protests that broke out Tuesday in Charlotte injuring about a dozen police officers. The protests were a direct response to the fatal shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott by a black police officer at an apartment complex on the city’s northeast side, according to media reports including MSN News.

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Professor Kami Chavis featured in Time magazine about why police departments don’t always release body cam footage

Associate Dean of Research and Engagement Kami Chavis, founder and director of the Criminal Justice Program, is featured in the following story by Time magazine’s  about “Why Police Departments Don’t Always Release Body Cam Footage” published on Aug. 17, 2016.

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Professor Kami Chavis calls Justice Department report findings regarding Baltimore Police ‘appalling’

Associate Dean of Research and Engagement Kami Chavis, founder and director of the Criminal Justice Program, is quoted in the following Wall Street Journal story that was published on Aug. 11, 2016, regarding the U.S. Justice Department’s report criticizing the Baltimore Police Department.

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