stephanie jackson

Photo of Faculty Emeritus Rhoda Billings ('66)

No longer a minority, Wake Forest Law’s long history of strong women leaders influence current students

In 1966, Rhoda Billings graduated first in her class from Wake Forest University School of Law. She was the only woman.

The year Billings enrolled in law school — 1963 — was also the year the American Bar Association (ABA) first began recording data on gender and law school enrollment. Fifty years after Billing’s graduation, women make up the majority of students enrolled at ABA-accredited law schools.

But Billings (JD ’66) is just one remarkable woman in a long line of strong women leaders at Wake Forest Law.

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Pro Bono Project’s “Know Your Rights” team presents about legal rights to WFU residential advisors

Members of the Wake Forest School of Law Pro Bono Project’s “Know Your Rights” team presented information on police encounters to undergraduate Resident Advisors (RAs) at Wake Forest University Monday, Oct. 12 on the Reynolda Campus. The “Know Your Rights” project is one of The Pro Bono Project’s newest ventures, with a mission to educate different community groups about their constitutional rights in various police interactions. This year, “Know Your Rights” will offer presentations not only to members of the Wake Forest University community but also to individuals at local prisons, high schools and churches.

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Photo of law student, Stephanie Jackson (JD '17)

Student Profile: Stephanie Jackson (JD ’17)

This student profile was created by the Wake Forest Law Pro Bono Project student staff. View the original article on their e-newsletter. Stephanie Jackson (JD ’17) hails from Ohio by way of New York, coming to Wake Forest Law after earning a Master’s in Higher Education and Student Affairs and working at NYU. Jackson’s passion before law school was education and equity, and those continue to drive her through law school. She is impacted by learning about the gaps in the law, why those gaps are not being filled, and what she can do. She hopes to continue working in the public service sector in policy after graduation. Continue reading »