Tanya Marsh

Professor Tanya Marsh writes in Huffington Post the Tsarnaev burial saga highlights a fundamental legal flaw

The Worcester (Massachusetts) Police Department reports that Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s body was buried in an undisclosed location in the middle of the night, bringing an end to a sad, unprecedented soap opera. This controversy has been resolved — but what happens next time? The Tsarnaev burial saga highlights a fundamental flaw in the American law regarding the disposition of human remains. Continue reading »

Professor Tanya Marsh co-authors paper, ‘The Impact of Dodd-Frank on Community Banks,’ with Joseph Norman (’12)

Many small banks will close or be forced to merge as a result of the regulatory costs and burdens of the Dodd-Frank Act, according to a new report.

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Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Tanya Marsh posing in the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Tanya Marsh quoted in New York Times regarding interment of Boston Marathon bombing suspect’s body

BOSTON — The body of Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing who died after a shootout with the police last month, has been interred in an undisclosed location, the Worcester Police Department said in a statement on Thursday morning.

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Professor Tanya Marsh quoted in Time magazine as search drags on for burial spot for Boston Marathon bombing suspect

BOSTON — Despite more than 100 offers, a Massachusetts funeral director is striking out in his search for a burial location for the body of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect who was killed in a gun battle with police. Continue reading »

Interring The Infamous: Professor Tanya Marsh talks to Radio Boston about the remains of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect

Interring the remains of the infamous has always been controversial. Which is why what remains of the most heinous humans is frequently destroyed. Timothy McVeigh, Columbine shooters Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, and Newtown killer Adam Lanza, were all cremated. Continue reading »

Professor Tanya Marsh writes about the fate of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect’s body in Huffington Post

The Worcester, Massachusetts funeral director with possession of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has reported that cemeteries in multiple states have refused to permit burial of his body. Continue reading »

Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Tanya Marsh posing in the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Tanya Marsh says Boston Marathon bombing suspect’s family, funeral home caught in legal Catch 22

The family of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev killed in a shootout with police can’t find a place to bury him, even as his body is being prepared for just that purpose, The Associated Press and other news organizations are reporting. This raises issues about laws regarding human remains, according to a Wake Forest Law Professor Tanya Marsh. Continue reading »

Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Tanya Marsh posing in the Worrell Professional Center

Cemetery Law Lunch and Learn ‘Unearthing the Law of Decedent Control of Their Remains’ to be held at Charlotte Center on Jan. 31

Is it legal to scatter ashes from cremation? May I remove those tombstones I just noticed in the backyard of my new home? Many myths surround the practice of disposing human remains.

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Photo of Wake Forest Law Professor Tanya Marsh posing in the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Tanya Marsh writes about laws permitting the sale of human remains in The Huffington Post

Etsy, the online marketplace for handcrafted items, updated its “prohibited items” policy last week to ban the listing of human remains or body parts, including skulls, bones, articulated skeletons, bodily fluids, preserved tissues and organs. (Hair and teeth are still allowed to be sold on Etsy.) A few online news outlets picked up the story, and the resulting chatter focused on several questions. “You can buy human remains on the Internet?” And even more fundamentally: “You can buy human remains?”

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July In Vienna

I just returned from spending July in Vienna, teaching a course on the Financial Crisis in the United States and Europe to a class of 10-4 from Wake Forest Law, one from SMU Law, and five from the University of Vienna law program.  Really incredible experience.

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