The Huffington Post

Photo of Professor Hal Lloyd with a photo of him studying in his carrel during law school

Professor Hal Lloyd: Bridging Commercial Law and the Humanities

The following profile about Professor Harold Lloyd was originally written by Rebecca Rich, who teaches legal writing at Duke University, and published in the April 2018 issue of Legal Writing Institute (LWI) Lives:

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Professor Harold Lloyd explores ‘Neil Gorsuch, Originalism, and the Fall of Icarus’ on Huffington Post blog

Professor Harold Lloyd wrote the following, “Neil Gorsuch, Originalism, and the Fall of Icarus,” and published it on The Huffington Post Blog on Feb. 3, 2017. 
Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

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Professor Christine Coughlin (JD ’90) takes on North Carolina court-packing rumors on Huffington Post blog

Professor Christine Coughlin (JD ’90) originally published the following post, “Court-Packing Rumors In North Carolina And The Need For Judicial Independence,” on The Huffington Post Blog on Nov. 22, 2016.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

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Photo of Professor Harold Lloyd in the Professional Center Library in the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Harold Lloyd responds to rumors of Gov. Pat McCrory’s attempt to ‘Pack The N.C. Supreme Court’ in Huffington Post blog

Professor Harold Lloyd published “Pat McCrory Should Think Twice Before Trying To Pack The North Carolina Supreme Court” on The Huffington Post blog on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, and can be found here.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

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Photo of Professor Shannon Gilreath in front of the Worrell Professional Center

Professor Shannon Gilreath (JD ’02) featured in Huffington Post Blog Q & A on North Carolina politics and recent events

Professor Shannon Gilreath (JD’02) was featured in a Q & A interview about North Carolina politics and recent events, including the Keith Lamont Scott protests and House Bill 2, on The Huffington Post Blog.  The following post, “How North Carolina Hurt Keith Lamont Scott,” was published by Jordan Barkin on Sept. 23, 2016.

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Professor Harold Lloyd authors ‘Poets as Artists of the Intentional’ on The Huffington Post blog

Professor Harold Lloyd published the following article, “Beyond Words Alone: Poets as Artists of the Intentional,” on The Huffington Post Blog on Sept. 25, 2016.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media. Continue reading »

Group photo of Wake Forest Law students at the 2016 commencement ceremony

John I. Sanders (JD ’16) authors Huffington Post blog post on insider trading

John I. Sanders (JD ’16), formerly a member of Wake Forest Law Review and the president and treasurer of the Wake Intellectual Property Student Association (WIPSA), authored the following post, “Insider Trading: A Danger for New Lawyers,” published on the Huffington Post blog on Sept. 16, 2016.

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John I. Sanders (JD ’16) writes about ‘Political Rhetoric and Hedge Fund Regulation’ on The Huffington Post

John I. Sanders (JD ’16) posted the following on his blog, “Political Rhetoric and Hedge Fund Regulation”on The Huffington Post on Aug. 18, 2016.

 

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Professor Michael Curtis writes ‘A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting’ in The Huffington Post

Professor Michael Curtis authored the following op/ed, “A Welcome Defeat for the North Carolina Legislature’s Effort to Hobble Black Voting,” in The Huffington Post on Aug. 2, 2016.  The post discusses the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to strike down North Carolina’s voter restriction laws, which were originally passed in 2013.  A three-panel judge made the unanimous decision on July 29, 20176.  The complete article follows.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.

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Professor Harold Lloyd responds in Huffington Post to Fourth Circuit’s striking of discriminatory provisions in N.C. election law

Professor Harold Lloyd wrote the following on his featured Huffington Post blog here published on July 29, 2016.
Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of our faculty members that are invited to write in national media outlets are their own, and not reflective of Wake Forest Law as an institution. Our policy is to re-publish all faculty member articles that are published in national media.
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down provisions of Gov. Pat McCrory’s “omnibus” election law requiring photo identification in form blacks are less likely to have and requiring changes to early voting, same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and preregistration all in ways carefully calculated to adversely affect black voters. The full text of the opinion merits careful reading and can be found here. Continue reading »