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U.S. Supreme Court

Appellate Advocacy Clinic hears arguments at U.S. Supreme Court

The Appellate Advocacy Clinic recently made its annual visit to the United States Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 19. There the clinic members observed oral arguments in the case of Americold Realty Trust v. ConAgra Foods and met with Supreme Court Fellow Debra Perlin. Before the trip, the clinic reviewed all the briefs in Americold.

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The Federalist Society holds U.S. Supreme Court round-up on Oct. 13

Wake Forest Law’s Federalist Society and the American Constitution Society held a U.S. Supreme Court round-up featuring commentary from Professors Wilson Parker and Ron Wright on upcoming U.S. Supreme Court decisions at noon on Tuesday, Oct. 13, in Worrell Professional Center.

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United States Supreme Court

Six Rose Council members among alumni to be sworn into the U.S. Supreme Court Bar on Monday, March 9

Six Rose Council members and two parents of Wake Forest Law graduates are among the 23 alumni who will be sworn into the U.S. Supreme Court Bar on Monday, March 9, 2015.

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Professors Michael Curtis and Eugene Mazo urge U.S. Supreme Court to hear North Carolina redistricting case

On a day that North Carolina was blanketed with snow, Professors Michael Kent Curtis and Eugene Mazo were busy urging the United States Supreme Court to hear an important redistricting case.

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United States Supreme Court

Fred Troll (BA ’68, JD ’71) reflects on his SCOTUS arguments in landmark sexual harassment case

Editor’s Note: This article features multimedia and is part of an ongoing series about our alumni and faculty and their experiences arguing in front of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Fred Troll (BA ’68, ‘JD 71) found himself arguing in front of the U.S. Supreme Court justices in a landmark sexual harassment case in 1986. “That was a very unsettled area back in the ’60s and ’70s,” he explained.

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Professor Margaret Taylor

Professor Margaret Taylor among law professors filing amici brief in Mellouli v. Holder

Professor Margaret Taylor is one of 89 law professors across the country filing an amici brief to support the petitioner of the Mellouli v. Holder case, which is currently pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. Continue reading »

C. Mark Wiley (’88) talks Supreme Court experience in U.S. v. Home Concrete & Supply

C. Mark Wiley (’85, JD ’88) is an attorney and Vice Chairman with Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP in the firm’s Winston-Salem, N.C. office. Wiley is no stranger to the area as a Double Deacon. His practices include healthcare transactions, tax law, and timberland resources. He helps companies plan efficient tax structures, and also works with clients to resolve tax controversies. In addition, Mark helps hospitals and physician groups form joint ventures. He received his Bar Admission to the U.S. Supreme Court in 2011 and worked on the U.S. Supreme Court case United States v. Home Concrete & Supply, LLC, argued on January 17, 2012.

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Gene Braswell (’70) argues in U.S. Supreme Court in 1979 Miranda rights case

A career highlight for R. Gene Braswell (’70) occurred in 1979, when he appeared before the U.S. Supreme Court to argue the case, North Carolina v. Butler. Continue reading »

Professor Harold Lloyd writes on Huffington Post blog about controversial SCOTUS ruling in Hobby Lobby case

Professor Harold Lloyd discusses the controversial U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the recent Hobby Lobby case and its potential implications in his blog post titled “Hobby Lobby: No Veil, No Precedent, No Multiple Players?” on

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Two couples among 20 Wake Forest Law alumni sworn in to the U.S. Supreme Court Bar

Two married couples were among the 20 Wake Forest Law alumni who were admitted and sworn in to the United States Supreme Court Bar on Tuesday, May 27, 2014. In all, 21 applicants associated with Wake Forest were sworn in to the high court, including a spouse of one alumna. Continue reading »